September is Gynecologic Cancer Awareness Month

“The Foundation for Women’s Cancer (FWC) declared September as Gynecologic Cancer Awareness Month (GCAM) with a goal of reaching more and more people each year with awareness of all gynecologic cancerscervical, ovarian, uterine/endometrial, vaginal and vulvar cancer.”

“Gynecological cancers encompass all cancers of the female reproductive system, including the cervix, ovaries, fallopian tubes, uterus, vulva, and vagina. All women are at risk for these cancers. According to the Centers for Disease Control, each year in the United States, approximately 89,000 women are diagnosed with gynecological cancers, and over 29,000 die from them. Each gynecological cancer has different signs and symptoms, as well as different risk factors. Risk increases with age.” – American Association for Cancer Research

Major Categories of Gynecological Cancers – American Association of Cancer Research
Gynecological Cancer Quiz: How much do you know? – CDC
Gynecological Cancer Screening Guidelines – Early detection is key – Loyola University Medical Center
Who is at more risk for gynecologic cancer? – The University of Rochester Medical Center

Vaginal Cancer

“Vaginal Cancer starts in the vagina. There are many different types of vaginal cancer, but the most common is called squamous cell carcinoma. It starts in the lining of the vagina.” – American Cancer Society

American Cancer Society
Centers for Disease Control & Prevention
Johns Hopkins Medicine
US National Library of Medicine – Medline Plus
National Cancer Institute
Mayo Clinic

Vulvar Cancer

American Cancer Society
Centers for Disease Control & Prevention
Centers for Disease Control & Prevention (Spanish)
Mayo Clinic
Johns Hopkins Medicine
US National Library of Medicine – Medline Plus

Uterine/Endometrial Cancer

“Endometrial cancer begins in the layer of cells that form the lining (endometrium) of the uterus. Other types of cancer can form in the uterus, including uterine sarcoma, but they are much less common than endometrial cancer.” – U.S. National Library of Medicine (NIH), MedlinePlus

Centers for Disease Control & Prevention
Centers for Disease Control & Prevention (Spanish)
Mayo Clinic
Medline Plus
National Cancer Institute
CancerCare
Foundation for Women’s Cancer

Uterine Sarcoma

“Uterine sarcoma is rare, making up less than 4 percent of all cancers of the uterus. Only 1,200 women are diagnosed with this disease in the United States each year.” — Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

Ovarian Cancer

“1 in 79 women will develop ovarian cancer in her lifetime. It is the fifth leading cause of cancer deaths in U.S. women. Early detection of ovarian cancer can increase life expectancy up to 95%.” – Teal It Up Ovarian Cancer Foundation

American Cancer Society
Centers for Disease Control & Prevention
Centers for Disease Control & Prevention (Spanish)
Mayo Clinic
Medline Plus
Teal It Up Ovarian Cancer Foundation
Tell Every Amazing Lady T.E.A.L.
National Ovarian Cancer Coalition
Ovarian Cancer Research Alliance

Cervical Cancer

“Cervical cancer starts in the cells lining the cervix, the lower part of the uterus.” – American Cancer Society

“Cervical cancer is a type of cancer that occurs in the cells of the cervix, the lower part of the uterus that connects to the vagina. Various strains of the human papillomavirus (HPV), a sexually transmitted infection, play a role in causing most cervical cancer. When exposed to HPV, the body’s immune system typically prevents the virus from doing harm. In a small percentage of people, however, the virus survives for years, contributing to the process that causes some cervical cells to become cancer cells.” – Mayo Clinic

American Cancer Society
American Cancer Society (Spanish)
Mayo Clinic – “Cervical Cancer Causes and Symptoms” 
Centers for Disease Control & Prevention
Centers for Disease Control & Prevention (Spanish)
World Health Organization
Medline Plus
Planned Parenthood
National Cervical Cancer Coalition
CWNY’s Interview with Dr. Rochelle Joly, M.D. on Cervical Cancer Screening and Prevention

Gestational Trophoblastic Disease

Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

Support Groups

SHARE — A national nonprofit that supports, educates, and empowers women affected by breast, ovarian, uterine or metastatic breast cancer, with a special focus on medically underserved communities. (English, Spanish and 17 other languages)
FORCE — Support for people facing hereditary cancer
Bright PinkFocused on helping young women prevent breast and ovarian cancer
Cervivor – Support for survivors and patients of cervical cancer
Cancer Support Community- Gilda’s Club Worldwide — Support for cancer patients or their loved ones by phone, online and in person.
Red Door Community – formerly Gilda’s Club NYC — Welcoming communities of free emotional and social support for everyone living with cancer – women, men, teens, children and their families.